Halloween and Having Autism

Halloween and Having Autism

What an exciting time of year it is for children, but maybe not so much if your child has Autism. There can be spooky costumes, scary noises, crowds of unfamiliar people, and so much more. But let’s think of how to make Halloween fun for your child. The first step is too consider if your child will wear a costume and if so which costume if right for them. You will want to be sure to order it in plenty of time and it is suggested to practice wearing it a few times to allow your child to get used to wearing it.

 

Furthermore, if you are worried about how trick or treating will go…it is suggested to practice at your house or even walking around the area that you will go trick or treating. This can prepare your child for the actual day of Halloween. Next, determine your schedule. If you don’t think your child will do well in the dark, prepare to end early or bring lights to make it less spooky for them. It may be helpful to go up to each door with your child or even make your neighbors aware not to scare or surprise them. Remember, we want this experience to be fun, not scary to our children. 

Another suggestion is to have your neighbors hand out items that your child really likes rather than candy. Parents typically set this up prior to Halloween and supply these items to their neighbors. This can make the child more motivated to go up to each house while enjoying the night more. Plus, this is often a healthier alternative to the load of candy that most children get.